COC announces the 15/16 season

COC announces the 15/16 season

One doesn’t usually return from season announcements cheerful like a loonie, but there you go: I am cheerful. The seasons are usually planned according to the customary Neef Balance: some bold stuff on one side, some stuff for the conservabores* (term I’m borrowing off Michelle E) on the other, ratio at about 50-50. Tonight, though, the interesting and the bold tipped ever so slightly. A harbinger?

So: the good stuff:

A new work, composer Barbara Feldman Monk‘s Pyramus and Thisbe (2010, but never performed) to be paired up with Monteverdi’s rarely staged shorts Il Combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda and Lamento di Arianna, in a brand new (is it ever) production by Christopher Alden. The P&T libretto is engaging with Rilke, Faulkner, St John of the Cross, according to this page. I can’t wait to see how Alden interweaves the three elements.

Claus Guth’s Nozze sounds good. It’s a rental from Salzburg, apparently a dark and non-comedic take on the piece. This review and this review both emphasize its intimist, non-political, psycho-sexual-drama approach. Picture me intrigued. Available on DVD, so I’ll probably get hold of it beforehand.

Neef also announced from the stage a series of new commissions for the next few years. In 2016, they’ll be taking James Rolfe + Anna Chatterton’s Donna to Banff for workshopping; Harry Somers’ Louis Riel will get a new production in 2017 (the old made-for-TV one is available on DVD and still fairly watchable), 2018 is the time for Rufus Wainwright’s opera on the Emperor Hadrian and his, er, favourite, and by 2020 Ana Sokolovic will have composed an opera on Michel Marc Bouchard’s libretto to be based on his play Christina, La Reine-Garçon. The strong representation of women in these productions is highly commendable, starting from Barbara Monk next year, or even starting from Kaija Saariaho a couple of seasons back.

And speaking of women, there is will be one stage director of female persuasion next year: Arin Arbus. Her CV sounds intriguing–she’s sometimes described as an off-Broadway luminary and an innovative Shakespearean. She’s also done theatre in correctional facilities. Her Traviata looks fairly traditional and pretty, though.

Which already introduced us to:

The mixed blessings stuff:

The Divo/a Vehicle this time isn’t as conservaborish as last year’s Don Quichotte: Rossini’s Maometto II with and for Luca Pisaroni will be directed by David Alden. It’s a Santa Fe production. I dunno. Rossini doesn’t lift any of my skirts, but it’s David Alden, and apparently Pisaroni is a rare coloratura basso, so… we’ll see. Also in that production, mezzo Elizabeth DeShong, who is always good news.

Siegfried. My least favourite bit of the Ring. BUT. It’s François Girard so there’s bound to be something of interest there. Also, Christopher Purves house-debuts as Alberich. Oh and, hello Maria Radner, the Erda of the production.

A Carmen revival. Title role to be sung by Anita Rachvelshvili and Clementine Margaine. An old production, which looks like this, but some money will be put into reinventing it. Knowing Joel Ivany of the AtG, who is given the task, good things may happen.

Some final bits of the good stuff:

– FINALLY. Two of the three new Ensemble Studio members are not Caucasian: tenor Charles Sy and pianist Hyejin Kwon. HEAR ME OUT NOW. These Young Singers programs across North America tend to be awfully white, and not only that, the women increasingly tend to be of a certain (thin) body type. Would be nice to begin to buck the trend and kinda rock? The cherriest of the cherries on the cake tonight, soprano Aviva Fortunata (aka Ensemble Studio’s Adele) sang a gorgeously somber Rossini aria while sounding like Marilyn Horne. Plus, there was Andrew Haji.

– The opera house was full for the event. It’s an invitation-only (subscribers, donors, the media, singers’ families eccetera) but due to the number of people and the mix, it felt like an almost open to the public event. Ideally, you’d want to have the unticketed open-door ‘outreach’ and education events and concerts inside the R. Fraser Elliott too, not only on the uncomfortable steps of the Richard Bradshaw. That’s the hope, anyway. Opera is an opportunity for a community, a society, to gather round, and take a good look at itself. (Totally agree with Gérard Mortier on this one.) A public forum, in many ways. There was a hint of that in the air last night. Don’t know how long this feeling will last, but it’s nice to experience it.

10 thoughts on “COC announces the 15/16 season

  1. You had me at “Rilke, Faulkner, St John of the Cross.” Much other interesting stuff here too… following the Parsifal delirium experience with François Girard, I would love to see what he does with Siegfried (which I also find the least appealing part of the Ring, despite its beauties.)

  2. Arin Arbus’s King Lear production at tfana last year was the best I’ve seen and by far the best thing I saw all year, fwiw. Not revolutionary, but detailed and gripping. On the other hand, that was a small space with next to no scenery, so I’m curious how she fares with Traviata in a big house.

    I see your point about Young Artist programs, though I will say Glimmerglass’s program tends to be pretty diverse. But they’ve also taken to hiring women conductors, so they’re obviously bent on destroying civilization.

    1. Seriously? That’s wonderful to hear. If you spot any other that is opening doors to people other than The Usual, let me know.

      I am also intrigued by AA’s record. Keeping my fingers crossed, but perhaps the pressures of directing in a big North American opera house are a whole different order of magnitude… I wonder how much freedom a director who isn’t an established internationally-sought-after bad boy has.

      1. Washington National Opera’s current YA lineup here.

        Francesca Zambello runs both Glimmerglass and WNO, and maybe she could answer your question about director freedom. Actually, I bet she’d be willing to talk about all sorts of fun & interesting things, plus it’s a master class in Arts Presenting just to watch her work a crowd. Score an interview, you can crash at the Republic and the Noise Ministry will drive.

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