Banging Was Heard

Another good thing about the 21C Festival is that you always end up going to things that you wouldn’t usually go to any other time. Last night I went to hear a band I didn’t know anything about — except its pianist Vicky Chow. The group consists of percussion, electric guitar, double bass and cello, keyboards, and clarinet/bass clarinet, plus the electronic component handled by an off-stage sound man and in most of the numbers tonight video as well.

Those of you who’ve seen Nicole Lizée’s work, this will bring it to mind, but unlike Lizee who makes her musicvideo forms herself, the BoaC band performs other composers’ works. One of the pieces that stood out for me was Christian Marclay’s Fade to Slide, which was played alongside his own film, an incongruous, compelling montage of short cuts from old movies that was accompanied by the live performance with split-second precision. John Oswald’s Fee Fie Foe Fum gave a pop hit from 1960s his signature plunderphonic treatment (take the existing sound, transform it) and a suitable video component to go with it. René Lussier used a recording of his wife’s snoring to compose within it a new work titled Nocturne. It’s a piece that’s not really played for laughs: while pre-recorded snoring was distinctly heard, the piece mainly fills in with instruments the space between two intakes of breath of a snorer. The inconsistent breaks between noise and silence in the snoring pattern is rendered faithfully. You are kept alert and guessing throughout – as a sleeper forced to stay alert to the erratic production of sound next to him. Will the snorer will go quiet with the next intake of breath, or is it going to be louder; is he changing rhythm or staying consistent. All of this is in the piece.

Caroline Shaw (in Really Craft When You) and Anna Clyne (A Wonderful Day) both used recordings of spoken word as the basis on which to compose. Shaw used archival recordings from the 1970s of quilters from North Carolina and Virginia and Clyne an old man’s singing–it’s hard to describe it, so head here for a shot of joy and wonder.

Gene Takes a Drink, a piece by Michael Gordon to the footage filmed by a cat going about his day, which was made into a film by Bill Morrison, holds your attention. David Lang’s unused swan was an extraordinary experience: an ensemble of instruments overpowered by–of all things–the closely miked chains coming to contact with the metal platform.

21C continues today (Sunday, May 28) with two more concerts: an Unsuk Chin extravaganza, and a Benjamin Bowman and Claudia Chan violin and piano tango.

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